Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Stacked Blocks in Progress: Day Two


5 7/8 x 24 oil on hardboard panel

It's no secret that I'm very fond of the Dick Blick cradled hardboard panels, but there are some gaps in the sizes they offer. One of my favorite sizes is the 12 x 24, which falls into that category. So, I took one of their 18 x 24's and cut it down. The larger section was used for the first Ketchup Bottle, and I worked out the composition above for the long skinny remaining piece. It is a very odd size, but I think it works. The first pass represents two days work. I think I'll offer it to Tree's Place for my show in July. Hopefully they'll like it.


4 comments:

rosaspicks said...

I love it! That tall skinny stack of blocks works perfectly!

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Ken D. Webber said...

You should check out the cradled wood panels from Cheap Joe's art supplies. They're ready for gesso when you buy them. I buy their Cheap Joe gesso as well and apply three to four coats with a foam roller. It makes a good ground with just enough tooth and it's higher quality and cheaper than the Dick Blick panels. I usually order in units of 30 and prep that many in a night. A 6" X 6" panel is usually around $2.00.

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